Archives for posts with tag: SHTF

I’m going to be a reading fool this Summer.  I have 3 books to read for work, book studies on educational topics.  I found a great deal on some others that I want to read for personal reasons: leadership, info., etc.  But two that I’m enjoying are: Battle Ready by Tom Clancy, I found that for $1 at Half Price Books in the clearance section, the other is One Second After by William Forstchen. One Second After is a fictional account of a very possible scenario that our country isn’t ready to deal with – an EMP attack.  We have no idea how much technology touches our lives.  An EMP attack would immediately take us all back to the Middle Ages.  The forward is by Newt Gingrich.  It sells for $17 on Amazon, but I picked it up for $7 @ Sam’s Club. http://www.amazon.com/One-Second-After-William-Forstchen/dp/0765317583/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1309198681&sr=8-1 Check out a Youtube video interview with the author here.

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So the zombie apocalypse happened and now you miss all the stuff you used to have. You miss the 5 Tv´s and the 4 computers and the tons of CD´s and the 3 cars. Why not start to change your “possession obsession” BEFORE you are forced to live with very little. This approach will make the transition considerably more tolerable. Remember that “More” is not necessarily “Better”

It is amazing how many things we have that we never use. It is even more amazing how much that stuff might be worth if we sell it though craigslist or eBay.

Living with less frees your spirit and makes you more flexible. It is also a projection of your self confidence. You start living more in the moment. There is nothing wrong with plans, goals and objectives. But there is a liberating feeling when you know that no matter what life throws at you, you will be able to handle it. So keeping your stock of “just in case” useless items to a minimum, you will make a statement to yourself that no event will be too big to handle. Try to keep things that have more than one use. Get rid of those items that are designed for a single superfluous use (like that exercise machine turned clothes hanger cluttering your room)

A good easy way to start de-cluttering your office or home is to compartmentalize your simplification initiative. Work your way room by room or area by area. Put aside the items that you think you won’t use and put them in a container. If you did not use any of them during the following 3 months, you can safely get rid of them. This includes some of those items that hold “sentimental” value. Be aware that most of them are just JUNK!

Keep in mind that if you are a “Prepper”, this initiative does not apply to your safety food stock. This philosophy relates more to the myriad of useless junk we never use but feel good about keeping. Imagine how much space you will save by ripping your 1,000 CD collection and storing all that music in your mp3 Player. You will find yourself listening to your favorite music more once is readily available electronically.

A fantastic definition of wealth that I heard somewhere goes something like this: “Wealth is the difference between what you have and what you need”. Needing fewer things in your life, will definitely make you wealthier.

Cheers!

Augusten

I hope I’m not wrong.  But I don’t believe that we will have a “Book of Eli,” “Mad Max,”  “The Walking Dead” type of world anytime soon.  Again, I hope I’m wrong.  I do believe that it is more likely that we would have an economic collapse or even more likely, a disruption of services…all types (transportation, medical, etc…).  But that is a different, longer post.

That belief, along with the reality that food prices are sky rocketing, leads me to believe, like so many others, that it would be a good idea to have some extra food laying around the house.

I’ve been going to the grocery store for my family for many, many years.  Back when we ran the group home (5-7 girls), it was my time to get out of the house for a bit! When we left the group home after 11 1/2 years, I just continued going.  When I go, I like to have a list and I want at least one week planned out.  But I know that there are some people that go every other day, on their way home from work, to buy things to make dinner.

If we have a disruption of services or anything else worse, the store shelves would be empty in no time.  Just visit a grocery store in Houston when a hurricane has been forecasted to hit! 😉

People who don’t have some type of food supply are going to be in deep water!  Now, I believe that most people are good.  I believe that neighbors will help neighbors.  That was the case in my neighborhood when we lost power for multiple days after Hurricane Ike.  My wife and I talked to neighbors that we had never met.

But, do you want to risk it?  Wouldn’t you rather be prepared? Informed?

Freeze dried good companies are so backed up right now.  A lot of it has to do with Glenn Beck talking about it on his show.  Having some super long term food might be a good practice, but most things have a decent shelf life.  For instance, canned goods have almost an indefinite shelf life.  Research has proven that some of the nutritional value, taste and coloring might go, but the food is still free from bacteria and good to eat.  But you might want to have more than Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup in the pantry.  What about rice, beans and flour for bread?

Check out some of these websites that talk about shelf life of some of our staple foods.

http://www.stilltasty.com/ – gives you dates for pantry, refrigerator & freezer
http://www.pdfdownload.org/pdf2html/pdf2html.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.henrycoema.org%2Fforms%2FStorage-Life-of-Groceries.pdf – pdf that you can download
http://standeyo.com/News_Files/Food/Extend_Shelf_Life.html – good info.
http://askville.amazon.com/food-longest-shelf-storage-life/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=8311272 – good posts

Lastly, if you decide to store some food, don’t empty your bank account and go to Costco to load up.  Be a good steward of your resources.  Buy items on sale, use coupons and be smart about it!  Put aside some money each week to go towards your investment…but rotate your stock.  Also, check these sites out for more helpful hints.

http://www.youtube.com/user/apriltx#p/a/u/2/fRtE0ZliwMk – Coupon savings
http://hubpages.com/hub/Food-Hoarding-for-Amateurs-Stocking-up-for-Emergencies-and-to-Save-Money-on-Groceries – Article
http://www.postpeakliving.com/guide-to-post-peak-living/food/stocking-up-a-pantry# – Article on why you should stock-up.
http://preparedchristian.net/food-storage-part-six-tips-on-stocking-up-and-affording-it-all/
– Good Article

Uhm… No!  I’m not talking about Harry Potter!  This can be considered pt.2 of my previous post, Our Lost Skills.

I don’t think anyone would deny that our advances in society are great.  I’m really glad I can go to the restroom in my nice, comfortable, warm restroom and not have to take a walk to the out-house.  But as things have become easier to make, buy, etc… we have lost some of the skills that were just common knowledge years ago.

Just the other day my dad was telling me about a lady on his block that would pay him for cutting her grass with canned fruit.  She would go to the local grocery store and buy fruit, at a reduced price, that was about to go bad and can it.  She was an old school prepper!  But something that was so common back then, is almost forgotten now…  Not everybody…you know what I mean.  It’s like those skills have become arts now.

But what if you could learn those skills?  You can go to Youtube and find some great tutorials and people who care about getting the info. out there.  But what if you could have a hands-on experience?  What would you like to learn?

  • canning
  • bread making
  • soap
  • gardening
  • water purification
  • orientation
  • edible plants around your area

Help me out here… Leave me a comment on what you would like to learn and then take the time to answer the poll (to the right).

If you want me to keep you updated… send me an email using the contact button to the right.  Thanks!

We at HOUSTONZOMBIES.COM use the Zombie Apocalypse as a fun metaphor for the end of the world. This end could be the end of a relationship, the end of your job, the end of a long professional career or even the end of a physical life due to slipping in a bathtub.

The idea is to be prepared for any major change in your life; develop flexibility skills, knowledge and become fiscally and mentally resilient. The end of your world will require you to be flexible and tough, smart and collaborative, knowledgeable and industrious.

I have gone through some interesting “catastrophic” experiences myself, a flash flood in Kansas, where everything we owned was destroyed in 45 minutes and Hurricane Alex in Monterrey, Mexico. After Alex, my family and I had to live for 5 days with no water and no electricity. Both were dangerously sobering experiences that taught me a lot about myself and helped my family become very adaptable.

As Todd mentioned in a previous post, things become really simple in a survival situation. You don’t worry about unnecessary stuff. Your inner chatter quiets down and you live in the moment. Your mind is focused in the task at hand, be it finding food, collecting rain water to be able to flush a toilet, or figuring out how to wash your whole body in a very efficient and effective way with just one bucket of water, a bar of soap and a washcloth.

One thing that we learned was that we could adapt to almost any kind of living situation as long as we all stayed together. We helped each other and did not allow any whining. We completely accepted and embraced the new situation without asking why us, or why now. Every day we had a plan to execute and we did it. Execution of a well thought out plan is a great cure for anxiety. Every night we would sit at the candle lit kitchen table and review what we had done that day, as well as play cards and tell stories. It was a surprisingly engaging situation that made us become very close in so many levels.

Here are some thoughts and points of action that can help you in a non-life threatening, but ugly situation: a great loss, a divorce, the failure of a business, a disabling illness or a death of a close relative.

  • Accept and embrace your new situation. Don’t judge it or complain about it.
  • Learn as much as you can about what is happening.
  • Develop a vision of your needs and what can be accomplished in the immediate, short and mid term.
  • Develop a well thought out action plan.
  • Execute your plans and evaluate the results of your action plan frequently.
  • Have a support team.
  • Make sure that the people you are sharing this experience with are as motivated as you to make the most out of it or help you go through it.

In future posts, Todd and I will be sharing some ideas about living a more fulfilling life during the current state of events; as well as explore helpful knowledge to survive in style, the imminent Zombie Apocalypse.

Breathe and stay happy. You never know when you’ll take your last breath.